Violent Repression of Dissent: Made in the U.S.A. — Erasing Borders

The militarized police forces responding to protests in the U.S. are duplicated by police trained by U.S. advisers worldwide. Violent repression of dissent and protest is favored by the current U.S. administration. Calling protestors of recent police killings of black men “terrorists” also characterizes the official response. Violent Repression of Dissent: Made in the U.S.A. —Continue reading “Violent Repression of Dissent: Made in the U.S.A. — Erasing Borders”

Memorial for Patrice Lumumba at Morehouse College

Dear friends, Morehouse College’s Africana Studies Program in collaboration with Friends of the Congo-Atlanta is proud to announce a Memorial for Patrice Lumumba on Friday, January 17 at 5:55 PM in African American Hall of Fame.  At 5:55 pm, we will gather at the Martin Luther King, Jr, monument to offer libation and then proceed upstairsContinue reading “Memorial for Patrice Lumumba at Morehouse College”

Black Power Pedagogies

archive.blackgothamarchive.org/items/show/61/index.html This is a photograph of Maritcha as an adult. In adulthood, Maritcha was able to fulfill her lifelong ambition of becoming a school teacher. In her memoir, she credited the many people who helped her at every step of the way. In childhood, there were her parents, who “made over a sickly, peevish, unproposingContinue reading “Black Power Pedagogies”

GERALD FORD & THE REST OF US

Samuel T. Livingston Original, January 8, 2007, revised July 12, 2019. An American President died last month; his death signaling the racial and ideological divides in America. Conservatives and whites generally mourned the man lauding his humility, moderation, and down-to-earth affability; Africans in America, generally, have been politely silent while the majority population grieves. This briefContinue reading “GERALD FORD & THE REST OF US”

The African Freedmen of San Miguel de Gualdape: Mapping the Chicora Lowcountry Foundations of African American History and Culture, 1520–1526

This essay, examines the place of the one hundred enslaved Africans in the lost colony of San Miguel de Gualdape (1526) as the earliest recorded event in African American history. This essay offers sixteenth-century Lowcountry history as a constructive context for understanding the importation of Africans in 1619 to Jamestown, Virginia. As such, the presentContinue reading “The African Freedmen of San Miguel de Gualdape: Mapping the Chicora Lowcountry Foundations of African American History and Culture, 1520–1526”

International Open Letter of Solidarity with Sudan and Algeria – تجمع المهنيين السودانيين

International Open Letter of Solidarity with Sudan and Algeria – تجمع المهنيين السودانيين — Read on http://www.sudaneseprofessionals.org/en/international-open-letter-of-solidarity-with-sudan-and-algeria/ Please read and act!